Kaparot

Kaparot (also known as Kaparos) is a controversial, ancient Jewish folk custom that is still performed by some (though not most) Jews today. The tradition is connected to the Jewish Day of Atonement, Yom Kippur, and involves whirling a chicken above one's head while reciting a prayer. The folk belief is that an individual's sins will be transferred to the chicken, thereby allowing them to begin the New Year with a clean slate. The chicken is then slaughtered and donated to the poor for consumption at the pre-fast meal.

 

Mea Shearim (100 Gates) is one of the oldest Jewish neighborhoods in Jerusalem, Israel. It is populated mainly by Haredi Jews (very orthodox). the neighborhood seems like stuck in time back in the late 1800's or early 1900's. The Kaparot ritual is performed every day in the market of Mea Shearim for about a week, from Rosh Ha Shana (the Jewish New Year's) until the eve of Yom Kippur.

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© 2014 By Sagi Kortler

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